It’s weird, it seems that when you run up against a problem, you always think it’s because “oh I’m not good enough”. But- it’s not that, it’s just that you’ve kind of hit the limit of your knowledge, and you’ve got to go out and observe and get and find and discover and nothing more. Those are really great, those are the best times- when you feel like you stink and you can’t get it- that’s like, man, now the world is open and you’re ready to learn something new and you gotta go, you gotta take advantage of that. — Glen Keane, “The Animation Podcast” (via archenjol)

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the-kellephant:

david-tennants-little-fangirl:

image

I still laugh at this every single time I see it.

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asker

markquestion asked: To expand on the prior question, do you have any tips on action poses. I'm having difficulty and need some exercises to practice with!

nargyle:

Pick the coolest pose in your head and draw it out! But it seems most everyone and their mom hate that answer, so allow me to attempt to expound on that:

It’s actually not difficult to make cool action poses-it’s more or less how you look at it and choose to portray it! Let’s take a generic action, like this badly drawn knave running

Okay, that’s some pretty cool action! But a principle in cartooning is to push, or exaggerate your poses and action. Let’s put some more conviction into his running!

Whoo, intense! Just by making him lean into his sprint, now the dude looks like he’s really exerting himself by running for his life, making the picture more exciting and dynamic. The same thing applies to other fundamental actions such as leaps, throws, and kicks!

This is another thing most people don’t think about, but explore different ways to depict your actions! Changing up the perspective and camera angle does contributes a lot to the mood and motion of a picture. Let’s demonstrate with running once again.

So by changing up the perspective and angles, even something as simple as running can turn into something more action-packed than a straight on view

Hope that helps somewhat!

lilayart:

Have you ever played Overlord? You should definitely check it out, it’s a cool game. And kinda different from dem typical smash-em-all. And you get to murder cute seals and copulating gnomes and everything. Play it.

lilayart:

Have you ever played Overlord? You should definitely check it out, it’s a cool game. And kinda different from dem typical smash-em-all. And you get to murder cute seals and copulating gnomes and everything. Play it.

lilayart:

Zoom in please.

lilayart:

Zoom in please.

lilayart:

Arno from the upcoming Assassin’s Creed Unity. I approve furiously, can you tell?
PS: Yes, I know the Eiffel tower wasn’t there until a hundred years AFTER the French Revolution. Hakuna your tatas.

lilayart:

Arno from the upcoming Assassin’s Creed Unity. I approve furiously, can you tell?

PS: Yes, I know the Eiffel tower wasn’t there until a hundred years AFTER the French Revolution. Hakuna your tatas.

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips — Asymmetry in facial expressions.A lot of times, asymmetry will bring energy and movement to a pose or composition. More specifically, I feel like breaking the symmetry of a character’s expression is key to bring interest to it. Of course, there’s always a situation where there’s a need for symmetry. On top of my head, I can think of depicting a character who has an authority role, or the “undefeated champion of something”, or the “cold stone killer”, etc. So, a symmetrical facial expression usually means the character is: supremely bored, supremely confident, has no emotions, has a poker face, or is dead. Did I miss one? Symmetry in framing is also quite rare, but when handled by a master (Kubrick, Anderson), it’s undeniable. (If you have time, watch this: http://vimeo.com/89302848)Now, back to asymmetry in facial expressions. In general, it’s a great way to flesh out a character’s thought process. What is he/she thinking about? What’s their goal?I’m just touching the tip of the iceberg here. Way more tips to come in the future. Maybe next time, I’ll start to cover GESTURES.Completely unrelated to the subject, I recently read a list of tips from movie director Sam Mendes. Here’s my favorite: “Try to learn to make the familiar strange, and the strange familiar. …”Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips — Asymmetry in facial expressions.

A lot of times, asymmetry will bring energy and movement to a pose or composition. More specifically, I feel like breaking the symmetry of a character’s expression is key to bring interest to it. Of course, there’s always a situation where there’s a need for symmetry. On top of my head, I can think of depicting a character who has an authority role, or the “undefeated champion of something”, or the “cold stone killer”, etc. So, a symmetrical facial expression usually means the character is: supremely bored, supremely confident, has no emotions, has a poker face, or is dead. Did I miss one? Symmetry in framing is also quite rare, but when handled by a master (Kubrick, Anderson), it’s undeniable. (If you have time, watch this: http://vimeo.com/89302848)

Now, back to asymmetry in facial expressions. In general, it’s a great way to flesh out a character’s thought process. What is he/she thinking about? What’s their goal?

I’m just touching the tip of the iceberg here. Way more tips to come in the future. Maybe next time, I’ll start to cover GESTURES.

Completely unrelated to the subject, I recently read a list of tips from movie director Sam Mendes. Here’s my favorite: “Try to learn to make the familiar strange, and the strange familiar. …”

Norm

lilayart:

Take your yaoi googles off, you sick bastards.

lilayart:

Take your yaoi googles off, you sick bastards.

lilayart:

Does anyone else notice slight degradation?

Waiting for inspiration is for amateurs. Just get to work. You just have to fail through the fear until you get something good.

Justin K Thompson

shinypinkbottle | @shinypinkbottle

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